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Monitoring Islam in Malaysia
Sudan's Economic Development Increases Despite Sanctions PDF Print E-mail

By Sabina Castelfranco
Khartoum
20 March 2008

Despite U.S. sanctions on the Khartoum government, the Sudanese economy is experiencing double digit growth. Infrastructure projects under way in the African country run into the hundreds of millions of dollars. Sabina Castelfranco reports for VOA from Khartoum.


ImageThe economy in Sudan is booming, despite U.S. sanctions and the fact that many Western nations believe this is a country where investment is too risky. The Economist Intelligence Unit has estimated a 10.3 percent growth in gross domestic profit in Sudan this year.

In 2006, the IMF put economic growth in Sudan at 12 percent. This has not gone unnoticed by some countries, such as China, Malaysia and Korea, which look at Sudan as a land of opportunity.

 
The Threat to Secular Democracy In Malaysia PDF Print E-mail
 "This section hopes to enlighten Muslim policy makers of the intensity of monitoring Islamic policies, and its impact to non-Muslims by various vested interest groups from within and outside"


by Farish A. Noor

AS far as complex plural societies go, Malaysia has to be one of the most complex and plural societies in the world at the moment. There are few countries with a racial, ethnic, linguistic and religious mix like Malaysia’s and I have to confess that I am more than annoyed when I meet Middle-Eastern friends who occasionally offer me nuggets of wisdom when they pontificate about how religious pluralism can and should be managed in Malaysia.

 
Pro-Muslim Tilt in Malaysia's Courts PDF Print E-mail

 "This section hopes to enlighten Muslim policy makers of the intensity of monitoring Islamic policies, and its impact to non-Muslims by various vested interest groups from within and outside"

 

Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia - An Islamic court ruled last week that a Malaysian man receive a Muslim burial, despite insistence by most of his family that he hadn't converted to Islam. His son, a Muslim, maintained that he had.

Such cases have become more common in Malaysia, whose leaders tout their multiracial democracy as a model of Islamic moderation and economic success. It's a claim echoed by American diplomats and Muslim intellectuals seeking a credible counterpoint to extremist voices in the Islamic world.

But the promises of religious and ethnic pluralism that nurtured a generation of Malaysians have begun to unravel. A pro-Muslim shift among lawyers and judges is alarming Christians, Hindus, and other non-Muslims who make up about 40 percent of the population. The remainder are predominantly ethnic Malay-Muslims, who benefit from affirmative-action programs to redress historic economic disparities.